Dr. Koufman’s Reflux-Friendly Gluten-Free Diet

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I believe that this book is the only source of reflux-friendly and gluten-free recipes

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In 2012, I saw a reflux patient with airway reflux who had completed reflux testing and when I was describing the induction (detox) diet, she interrupted to tell me that was gluten-free. At the time, I did not know enough about this topic to say anything useful and so I just asked her to adapt as best she could to a “reflux-friendly gluten-free” diet. Since that time, I have learned a more about food additives and about gluten, and some from personal experience.

Not long ago I went to see my doctor about my psoriasis. (I have psoriasis on my elbows knees hands and face and I’ve had it for many years; unfortunately, it has gotten worse in the last year.) I also have mild hypothyroidism. My doctor pointed out that certain thyroid conditions and psoriasis are probably autoimmune disorders that they sometimes respond to a gluten-free diet. So, I went on a gluten-free, dairy-free, sugar-free diet; and a week later, I noticed some improvement in my psoriasis.

While the relationship between gluten and autoimmune disease is unproven, there is accumulating evidence to suggest the relationship is real.  Here is a link to a nice review article.

A gluten-free diet is a diet that excludes the protein gluten. Gluten is found in grains such as wheat, barley, and rye. While a gluten-free diet is usually used to treat celiac disease, an inflammatory disease of the small intestines, it may play a role in other autoimmune diseases, e.g., psoriasis, arthritis, scleroderma, thyroid disease. It also is believed to be related to some cases of acid reflux. Eating a gluten-free diet may help some people with the above conditions improve their symptoms.

I am providing here for my readers a hybrid diet that takes into account elements of my reflux diet, that is, a low-fat, low-acid, pH-balanced diet with a gluten-free, dairy-free, sugar-free diet. This is, crude as it is, my reflux friendly gluten-free diet. Caveat emptor and good luck!

Switching to a gluten-free diet is a big change and, like anything new, it takes some getting used to. You may also be surprised to realize how many gluten-free products, such as bread, pasta, frozen foods are now available. Specialty grocery stores like Whole Foods sell lots of different gluten-free foods.

What You Can’t Eat

Barley (NB: malt, malt flavoring, and malt vinegar are usually made from barley)
Rye
Triticale (a cross between wheat and rye)
Wheat (avoid all unless labeled gluten-free)
Beer
Breads (unless they are labeled gluten-free, dairy-free, and sugar-free)
Cakes and pies (unless they are labeled gluten-free, dairy-free, and sugar-free)
Candies (unless they are labeled gluten-free, dairy-free, and sugar-free)
Cereals (unless they are labeled gluten-free, dairy-free, and sugar-free)
Cookies and crackers (unless they are labeled gluten-free, dairy-free, and sugar-free)
Croutons
French fries
Gravies
Imitation meat or seafood
Oats (unless labeled gluten-free)
Matzo
Pastas
Processed luncheon meats
Salad dressings (unless labeled gluten-free)
Sauces, including soy sauce
Seasoned rice mixes
Seasoned snack foods, such as potato and tortilla chips
Self-basting poultry
Soups and soup bases (unless labeled gluten-free, dairy-free, and sugar-free)
Vegetables in sauce
Avoid food additives, such as malts, starches and medications and vitamins that use gluten as a binding agent
 

What You Can Eat

Fruits
Fruit is free of gluten but some fruits are better than others when it comes to reflux. (Acid fruits are best consumed with alkaline water (pH>8.5) or low-fat almond or soy milk)
Apples (red, not green, in moderation, and only after induction)
Apricot (in moderation, and only after induction)
Bananas
Blueberries (in moderation, and only after induction)
Cantaloupe
Carob
Dates
Figs
Guava
Honeydew melon
Peaches (in moderation, and only after induction)
Pears (in moderation, and only after induction)
Plums (in moderation, and only after induction)
Raspberries (in moderation, and only after induction)
Strawberries (in moderation, and only after induction)
Watermelon
Zest, the outside of lemon, lime, or orange (not the juice or the fruit)

Vegetables
Vegetables are also naturally free of gluten (fresh or frozen vegetables, that is, not canned)
Acorn
Agar
Alfalfa
Arrowroot
Artichoke
Arugula
Asparagus
Avocado
Beans
Broccoli
Brussel Sprouts
Cauliflower
Cabbage
Carrots
Celery
Corn
Cucumber
Eggplant
Green Beans
Kale
Lettuce
Mushrooms
Okra
Onions (cooked, in moderation, and only after induction)
Parsley
Peas
Potatoes (white and sweet)
Pumpkin
Radish
Spinach
Squash
Turnip
Watercress

Meats
Meats are always gluten free unless processed, breaded, or fried with breadcrumbs; also avoid gravy as most gravy does have gluten in it. Fish is included here in the meat category.
Beef (in moderation, and only after induction)
Buffalo
Chicken
Fish (including shellfish, broiled, baked, grilled, but not breaded or fried)
Goat
Goose
Pork (white pork, pork tenderloin only, in moderation, and only after induction)
Rabbit
Snake
Turkey
Quail
Veal
Venison

Flours and Grains
Almond Flour
Amaranth
Arrowroot
Bean flour
Besan
Brown rice
Brown rice flour
Buckwheat
Cassava
Corn flour
Corn meal
Corn starch
Cottonseed
Flaxseed
Millet
Pea Flour
Polenta
Popcorn (without any coating)
Potato flour
Quinoa
Rice
Sago
Soy Flour
Tapioca Flour
Taro Flour
Yucca

Other Gluten-Free Foods
Almonds (in moderation, and only after induction)
Baking Soda
Herbs
Honey (Manuka honey preferred)
Oils
Pistachios (in moderation, and only after induction)
Seeds
Spices (most)
Wine (in moderation; one glass only and only after induction)

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